Ostrobothnian sweaters and accessories: new book Lankapaitoja ja muita asusteita

About a year ago I was asked if I could make a Korsnäs sweater for a new book “Lankapaitoja”. I happily said Yes, I can! The writers Marketta Luutonen and Anna-Maija Bäckman are both accomplished writers and editors, and both have done a life long work in craft associations. Marketta wrote her doctor’s thesis about sweaters: “Rustic Product as a conveyor of meaning, A Study of Finnish Pullovers” (text in Finnish).

The gorgeous photos in Lankapaitoja  are taken by Anna-Maija’s husband Gunnar Bäckman, who worked as a professional photographer for many decades.

The sweater I made a copy of is in child’s size, 2-3 years old. The original is in the Finnish National Museum. I got two photos to work from, which wasn’t a problem as they were taken by Gunnar Bäckman. The sweater is unique because of the use of colours: the pink yarn used has not been found in sweaters for adults. I took this photo when I had finished the sweater.

Korsnäs sweaters are unique because of the techniques used, and because of the many colours in a culture where the natural sheep colours white, brown, and black and blends of those was much more common: there’s tapestry crochet in the hem, the upper part of the body, and in the cuffs and upper parts of the sleeves. The “lus”-pattern known from Norwegian sweaters is knitted.

The sweater is named after the municipality where it’s been made since the 19th century. I visit the small museum in Korsnäs almost every summer. The impression when you enter the room with the sweaters is overwhelming every time: it’s so red! So colourful! It’s a wonderful room.

A unique technique was also used in earlier days for knitting the middle part of the body: three knitters sit in a round and knit their own rows simultaneously. The best knitter knits the “lus” (the stranded knitting with one white stitch, and one red or green in alternating rows). This photo is from a knit-in-public day at the museum:

The tapestry crochet was always done by an expert. Not many could do it.

I first learned to knit and crochet the Korsnäs sweater at Marketta Luutonen’s first class in 1982. Even if I haven’t made more than two adult and this one child sweater, I’m fascinated by it. I really do want to make one more.

But, back to the book. There’s much more than the Korsnäs sweaters in the book. Sweaters and accessories from the western coastal region fill the beautiful book. There are also new interpretations of old finds, all just as well made and with the piety you can expect from the two ladies. An example: a cardigan designed by Anna-Maija from an old vest, knitted and crocheted by Jeanette Rönnqvist-Aro and Berit Bagge. Sorry about the bad photo quality, the photo is from an evening at an exhibition where Marketta and Anna-Maija talked about knitting history and the book. The photo in the background shows the vest:

This is also from the exhibition. My small sweater compared to the ones for adults.

The book has 255 pages, 23×30 cm, printed on high class paper with a beautiful layout. It’s written in Finnish, and there will be a Swedish version in the autumn. I don’t know anything about an English version, but my personal opinion is that this is a book that should be translated. The quality is amazing all through, and I’m sure the sweaters, cardigans, purses, mittens etc would interest a bigger audience. Besides the expertly written section about knitting and crochet history in Finland, there are also written patterns with charts.

 

My sweater modeled by a lovely boy!

I finish with a photo showing what you sometimes have to work with when using items from museums (and there are far worse examples): 

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5 comments

  1. Marilyn F.

    Barbro, what a stunning child’s sweater you have made! And congratulations for your contribution to the book, you are now even more famous. I’d love to see the book, but may have to wait for the English version to come out. This is a very interesting post with picture of the museum collection of costumes, the three women knitting at once (I still haven’t quite figured out how they do it), and the modern designed gray sweater. Your sweater suits the little boy very well in the photo. I am wondering if the tapestry crochet strengthens the areas of the sweater that it is used in – the bottom edge, the shoulders, the neck and the cuffs. Is that true? It seems like an excellent idea. Thank you for sharing your lovely child’s sweater.

    • Barbro Heikinmatti

      Thank you Marilyn! Yes, the tapestry crocheted parts of the Korsnäs sweater are sturdy and strong. There’s a joke about the sweater that says it’s perfect for a man who’s starting to grow a middle age belly: the knitted part is stretchy so there’s still room for the belly 🙂 And I haven’t quite found out how the ladies manage the knitting either!

      • Marilyn F.

        Ah, so the tapestry crochet is stretchy? I would have thought it would not be. Funny story about it stretching for a man’s growing belly. LOL. Maybe you can actually visit the museum when they have a knit-in-public day to see how they do it. It seems like a very efficient way to get the less interesting part of the sweater knitted when you have more people working on it at one time. Susan says hello and she is reading and enjoying your blogs and she loves your sweater, but her computer will not let her answer.

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